Roth IRAs For Your Teen

June 07, 2024

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

The following presentation by New England Capital Financial Advisors, LLC (“NECFA”) is intended for general information purposes only.  No portion of the presentation serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from NECFA or any other investment professional of your choosing.  Please see additional important disclosure at the end of this penetration. A copy of NECFA’s current written disclosure Brochure discussing our advisory services and fees is available upon request or at www.newenglandcapital.com.

Roth IRAs For Your Teen

Summer break is here, and many young people will be working at a summer job or internship. While earning a paycheck is exciting, it can also be an excellent time to consider opening a Roth IRA and contributing a portion of their summer earnings. Not only does this jump-start retirement savings from an early age, but it can also serve as a positive learning experience about the principles of saving, investing, and cultivating long-term wealth.

The Roth IRA offers a unique combination of tax advantages and flexibility, making it an excellent choice for young savers.  To contribute to a Roth IRA, your child must have earned income from a job, and the maximum contribution for 2024 is $7,000 or the total of their earned income, whichever is less. You can open and manage the account until they reach the age of majority in your state.  As an incentive, we have had clients match their kids/grandkids contributions into the Roth IRA, making sure not to exceed the total income the child earned or $7,000 – the lesser of the two.

Here are a few key benefits:

  • Tax-free growth: Roth IRA contributions are made with after-tax dollars, so your child won't pay taxes (and perhaps penalties) until they make withdrawals.
  • Penalty-free withdrawals of contributions at any time: Your child can withdraw up to the amount of their total contributions at any time, for any reason, without paying taxes or penalties.
  • Early withdrawals of earnings: If your child withdraws amounts that exceed their contributions before age 59½ or before the account has been open for five years, they may face taxes and a 10% early withdrawal penalty on the earnings portion of the withdrawal.
  • Exceptions to early withdrawal penalties: Your child can withdraw funds before age 59½ or before the account has been open for five years for several reasons (keep in mind that you may be able to avoid penalties but not taxes on any earnings), including:
    • Funds can be used for qualified higher education expenses.
    • First-time home purchase (up to a $ 10,000 lifetime limit.)
    • If your child becomes disabled.
    • For certain emergency expenses.
    • If your child is unemployed, they can use a withdrawal to help pay for health insurance premiums.

The flexibility and withdrawal choices for a Roth IRA can make it an attractive choice for young savers who may need access to their money in the future while still providing a powerful tool for long-term wealth building. If you'd like to discuss opening a Roth IRA for your child or grandchild, please feel free to contact our office. And feel free to share this with anyone you think might be interested.  We at New England Capital Financial Advisors wish you and your family a wonderful start to the summer!

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

Please remember that past performance is no guarantee of future results.  Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by New England Capital Financial Advisors, LLC [“NECFA”]), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this blog will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful.  Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions.  Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this blog serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from NECFA. To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing. NECFA is neither a law firm nor a certified public accounting firm and no portion of the blog content should be construed as legal or accounting advice. A copy of the NECFA’s current written disclosure Brochure discussing our advisory services and fees is available for review upon request or at www.newenglandcapital.comPlease Note: NECFA does not make any representations or warranties as to the accuracy, timeliness, suitability, completeness, or relevance of any information prepared by any unaffiliated third party, whether linked to NECFA’s web site or blog or incorporated herein, and takes no responsibility for any such content. All such information is provided solely for convenience purposes only and all users thereof should be guided accordingly. Please Remember: If you are a NECFA client, please contact NECFA, in writing, if there are any changes in your personal/financial situation or investment objectives for the purpose of reviewing/evaluating/revising our previous recommendations and/or services, or if you would like to impose, add, or to modify any reasonable restrictions to our investment advisory services.  Unless, and until, you notify us, in writing, to the contrary, we shall continue to provide services as we do currently. Please Also Remember to advise us if you have not been receiving account statements (at least quarterly) from the account custodian.